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Israel and Iran - Is This a Purim story Redux?

The Purim story and its connection to the Holy Temple and the challenges facing us today.
First Publish: 3/4/2015, 10:11 PM

Binyamin Netanyahu
Binyamin Netanyahu
Miriam Alster/Flash 90

This week, as the people of Israel celebrate Purim, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu addresses Congress on the Iranian threat.

Is this a Purim story redux? On this week's pre-Purim edition of Temple Talk, Yitzchak Reuven and Rabbi Richman discuss the Purim story and its connection to the Holy Temple and the challenges facing us today. 

Click here to download the podcast

Report: IAF Struck Hezbollah Missile Convoys in Western Syria

Two IAF raids reported on Wednesday and Friday targeted Hezbollah arms convoys. At least one person reported killed.
First Publish: 4/25/2015, 8:55 PM

F-16 fighter jet
F-16 fighter jet
Flash 90

Syrian and Lebanese media are reporting at least two IAF raids that struck targets in Western Syria, but there is still confusion regarding when they took place and what targets were hit.

According to Channel 2's website, “unofficial media” in Syria and Lebanon said there were two attacks – the second one on Friday, against Hezbollah trucks that carried surface-to-surface missiles. Photographsthat were published showed the remains of the bombed targets.

Another Hezbollah convoy was struck Wednesday at al-Qalamoun and at least one person was killed in that attack, according to Al Arabiya.

Al-Qalamoun is located near the region bordering Lebanon.

According to Lebanese television station LBC, the targets were centers and mobile forces from Brigades 65, 155 and 192 of the Syrian Army, which possess heavy missiles that were meant for Hezbollah, the Shiite Lebanese militia that is a proxy of Iran..

The IAF raid at al-Qalamoun hit a missile depot in the strategic western Syrian region, Al Arabiya News’ sister channel Al Hadath reportedThursday. 

Sources also told Al Hadath that two other IAF strikes on Wednesday had targeted a convoy carrying arms belonging to, or meant for, Hezbollah.

The sources reported several explosions at Al-Qutayfah, Yabroud and Qarah, on the outskirts of Damascus.

The IDF said in response to the reports that it does not comment on reports from foreign sources.

On April 4, Arab news sources reported that an unidentified jet believed to be Israeli destroyed warehouses in southern Libya that held weapons bought by Iran for Hamas.

According to the reports in Al Watan and other news outlets, the warehouses were completely destroyed. The weapons that were inside them had allegedly been purchased by Iran, by means of weapons dealers in Sudan and Chad, and were supposed to be smuggled to Hamas through Egypt, by means of the smuggling tunnels between Sinai and Gaza.

The destruction of the weapons stores in southern Libya was carried out in coordination with the Egyptian security and intelligence apparatuses, the reports claimed.

Al Watan added that Egypt allowed the Israeli jet to pass through its airspace en route to southern Libya.

On January 18, a reported IAF strike killed Jihad Mughniyeh, the son of Imad Mughniyeh, who was one of the personal bodyguards of Hezbollah's top terrorist Hassan Nasrallah.

A vehicle that Mughniyeh and his fellow Hezbollah terrorists were riding in had entered the Syrian side of the Golan from Lebanon. Also killed in the strike was an Iranian general.

Today, 12:06 PM | Giulio Meotti
In the EU capital, churches are now restaurants

Giulio Meotti

The Church of St. Catherine, built in 1874, dominates the historic center of Brussels. It is the only religious building built in the city’s “pentagon” at the end of Ancien Régime and today is one of the more protected ones in the European Union capital after the terror attacks.

The city of Brussels, however, had declared its intention to convert the church into a fruit and vegetable market. Only the mobilization of the faithful hindered the city's plan.


In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.
But the Church of St. Catherine is not a rare case in Belgium: 90 churches are in imminent danger in the country. The Church of Saint-Hubert in Watermael-Boitsfort is expected to accommodate apartments, while the Church of the Holy Family of Schaerbeek is waiting for a potential investor. With the radical reduction of the faithful, many churches have been abandoned. 

In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.

In Namur, the Saint-Jacques Church was transformed into a clothing store.

In Tournai, the Church of St. Margherita has been transformed into a series of apartments.

Also in Namur, the Church of Notre Dame, built in 1749 and deconsecrated in 2004, it is now a “cultural space”. The square will be redeveloped, with ticketing services and catering. Dozens of exhibitions, concerts and fashion shows have already been held in the church.

La Libre national newspaper reveals the fate of Belgian christianity. Half of the country's churches risk conversion or abandonment. 35 churches out of 110 in Brussels will be closed since Christian practitioners are just 1.5 percent of the population of the European Union’s capital, according to a 2010 survey at the University of Leuven. 

The first to break the taboo, in 2008, was Philip Heylen, Vice Mayor of Antwerp, who invited the city to use these churches as Islamic places of worship. In Brussels, about half of the children in state schools are Muslim.

Eight centuries after its founding, the Church of the Blessed Sacrament at Binche, a majestic building in the heart of a medieval town about fifty kilometers from Brussels, was put on sale for the symbolic sum of 1 euro. 

In the meantime in Mechelen, Flanders, a luxury hotel has arisen in place of a Gothic church. Christian arches, columns and windows are still in place between menus and tables for customers. Once the pride of Gothic architecture of Belgium, the hotel now is ranked among the five most beautiful in the world.

In the future Belgium will be dominated by 295 mosques (77 in Brussels alone) and the transparent buildings of EU and NATO.

Jewish synagogues, now protected as military bases, will also be abandoned as the Jews depart due to anti-Semitism.

Brussels will be turned into a postmodern mecca for Islam. 

www.israelnationalnews.com
Arutz Sheva
your Israel news site‏<br< div="">
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Arutz Sheva, your Israel news site‏
Today, 12:06 PM | Giulio Meotti
In the EU capital, churches are now restaurants

Giulio Meotti

The Church of St. Catherine, built in 1874, dominates the historic center of Brussels. It is the only religious building built in the city’s “pentagon” at the end of Ancien Régime and today is one of the more protected ones in the European Union capital after the terror attacks.

The city of Brussels, however, had declared its intention to convert the church into a fruit and vegetable market. Only the mobilization of the faithful hindered the city's plan.


In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.
But the Church of St. Catherine is not a rare case in Belgium: 90 churches are in imminent danger in the country. The Church of Saint-Hubert in Watermael-Boitsfort is expected to accommodate apartments, while the Church of the Holy Family of Schaerbeek is waiting for a potential investor. With the radical reduction of the faithful, many churches have been abandoned. 

In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.

In Namur, the Saint-Jacques Church was transformed into a clothing store.

In Tournai, the Church of St. Margherita has been transformed into a series of apartments.

Also in Namur, the Church of Notre Dame, built in 1749 and deconsecrated in 2004, it is now a “cultural space”. The square will be redeveloped, with ticketing services and catering. Dozens of exhibitions, concerts and fashion shows have already been held in the church.

La Libre national newspaper reveals the fate of Belgian christianity. Half of the country's churches risk conversion or abandonment. 35 churches out of 110 in Brussels will be closed since Christian practitioners are just 1.5 percent of the population of the European Union’s capital, according to a 2010 survey at the University of Leuven. 

The first to break the taboo, in 2008, was Philip Heylen, Vice Mayor of Antwerp, who invited the city to use these churches as Islamic places of worship. In Brussels, about half of the children in state schools are Muslim.

Eight centuries after its founding, the Church of the Blessed Sacrament at Binche, a majestic building in the heart of a medieval town about fifty kilometers from Brussels, was put on sale for the symbolic sum of 1 euro. 

In the meantime in Mechelen, Flanders, a luxury hotel has arisen in place of a Gothic church. Christian arches, columns and windows are still in place between menus and tables for customers. Once the pride of Gothic architecture of Belgium, the hotel now is ranked among the five most beautiful in the world.

In the future Belgium will be dominated by 295 mosques (77 in Brussels alone) and the transparent buildings of EU and NATO.

Jewish synagogues, now protected as military bases, will also be abandoned as the Jews depart due to anti-Semitism.

Brussels will be turned into a postmodern mecca for Islam. 

www.israelnationalnews.com
Arutz Sheva
your Israel news site‏<br< div="">
 print
Arutz Sheva, your Israel news site‏
Today, 12:06 PM | Giulio Meotti
In the EU capital, churches are now restaurants

Giulio Meotti

The Church of St. Catherine, built in 1874, dominates the historic center of Brussels. It is the only religious building built in the city’s “pentagon” at the end of Ancien Régime and today is one of the more protected ones in the European Union capital after the terror attacks.

The city of Brussels, however, had declared its intention to convert the church into a fruit and vegetable market. Only the mobilization of the faithful hindered the city's plan.


In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.
But the Church of St. Catherine is not a rare case in Belgium: 90 churches are in imminent danger in the country. The Church of Saint-Hubert in Watermael-Boitsfort is expected to accommodate apartments, while the Church of the Holy Family of Schaerbeek is waiting for a potential investor. With the radical reduction of the faithful, many churches have been abandoned. 

In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.

In Namur, the Saint-Jacques Church was transformed into a clothing store.

In Tournai, the Church of St. Margherita has been transformed into a series of apartments.

Also in Namur, the Church of Notre Dame, built in 1749 and deconsecrated in 2004, it is now a “cultural space”. The square will be redeveloped, with ticketing services and catering. Dozens of exhibitions, concerts and fashion shows have already been held in the church.

La Libre national newspaper reveals the fate of Belgian christianity. Half of the country's churches risk conversion or abandonment. 35 churches out of 110 in Brussels will be closed since Christian practitioners are just 1.5 percent of the population of the European Union’s capital, according to a 2010 survey at the University of Leuven. 

The first to break the taboo, in 2008, was Philip Heylen, Vice Mayor of Antwerp, who invited the city to use these churches as Islamic places of worship. In Brussels, about half of the children in state schools are Muslim.

Eight centuries after its founding, the Church of the Blessed Sacrament at Binche, a majestic building in the heart of a medieval town about fifty kilometers from Brussels, was put on sale for the symbolic sum of 1 euro. 

In the meantime in Mechelen, Flanders, a luxury hotel has arisen in place of a Gothic church. Christian arches, columns and windows are still in place between menus and tables for customers. Once the pride of Gothic architecture of Belgium, the hotel now is ranked among the five most beautiful in the world.

In the future Belgium will be dominated by 295 mosques (77 in Brussels alone) and the transparent buildings of EU and NATO.

Jewish synagogues, now protected as military bases, will also be abandoned as the Jews depart due to anti-Semitism.

Brussels will be turned into a postmodern mecca for Islam. 

www.israelnationalnews.com
Arutz Sheva
your Israel news site‏<br< div="">
 print
Arutz Sheva, your Israel news site‏
Today, 12:06 PM | Giulio Meotti
In the EU capital, churches are now restaurants

Giulio Meotti

The Church of St. Catherine, built in 1874, dominates the historic center of Brussels. It is the only religious building built in the city’s “pentagon” at the end of Ancien Régime and today is one of the more protected ones in the European Union capital after the terror attacks.

The city of Brussels, however, had declared its intention to convert the church into a fruit and vegetable market. Only the mobilization of the faithful hindered the city's plan.


In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.
But the Church of St. Catherine is not a rare case in Belgium: 90 churches are in imminent danger in the country. The Church of Saint-Hubert in Watermael-Boitsfort is expected to accommodate apartments, while the Church of the Holy Family of Schaerbeek is waiting for a potential investor. With the radical reduction of the faithful, many churches have been abandoned. 

In Malonne, the chapel of Piroy has been transformed into a brewery.

In Namur, the Saint-Jacques Church was transformed into a clothing store.

In Tournai, the Church of St. Margherita has been transformed into a series of apartments.

Also in Namur, the Church of Notre Dame, built in 1749 and deconsecrated in 2004, it is now a “cultural space”. The square will be redeveloped, with ticketing services and catering. Dozens of exhibitions, concerts and fashion shows have already been held in the church.

La Libre national newspaper reveals the fate of Belgian christianity. Half of the country's churches risk conversion or abandonment. 35 churches out of 110 in Brussels will be closed since Christian practitioners are just 1.5 percent of the population of the European Union’s capital, according to a 2010 survey at the University of Leuven. 

The first to break the taboo, in 2008, was Philip Heylen, Vice Mayor of Antwerp, who invited the city to use these churches as Islamic places of worship. In Brussels, about half of the children in state schools are Muslim.

Eight centuries after its founding, the Church of the Blessed Sacrament at Binche, a majestic building in the heart of a medieval town about fifty kilometers from Brussels, was put on sale for the symbolic sum of 1 euro. 

In the meantime in Mechelen, Flanders, a luxury hotel has arisen in place of a Gothic church. Christian arches, columns and windows are still in place between menus and tables for customers. Once the pride of Gothic architecture of Belgium, the hotel now is ranked among the five most beautiful in the world.

In the future Belgium will be dominated by 295 mosques (77 in Brussels alone) and the transparent buildings of EU and NATO.

Jewish synagogues, now protected as military bases, will also be abandoned as the Jews depart due to anti-Semitism.

Brussels will be turned into a postmodern mecca for Islam. 

www.israelnationalnews.com
Arutz Sheva
your Israel news site‏<br< div="">
 print
Arutz Sheva, your Israel news site‏